DevBit – WTF Are You Doing?

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Seriously? Do you have any idea? You mite. But I’m willing to bet that you don’t. You’ve been doing the same thing for so long, that whatever you do, just makes sense in your head. It may work, it may not, but to you, it makes sense.

I have no idea what I’m doing. At least I didn’t. It took me a very long time, in fact, for one of my businesses, I’m still figuring it out. That business is SureFireWebServices.com. I mean on the front, I think it’s pretty obvious. The site is a blog, and we do development and design for clients, and we sell courses. Do you see where the “I have no clue what I’m doing” falls in?

When you have one focal point on a site, it’s much easier to market and much more effective. For example, wpcurve.com, they only do WP maintenance. OptinMonster only has one plugin to focus on. WPMU Dev – WP Themes and plugins. And the list can go on.

What about us WebPreneurs? WTF Are we doing!? We sell our services. Notice the plural. We do so many things that it’s hard to pin point what’s going to make you stand out or what exactly your going to market.

What about your email list? Why are you building one? Did you even put a strategy in place? Are you planning on eventually selling your services?

My whole point is it’s time to start thinking about WHY we do things as oppose to just doing them. Yes, on occasion, just doing works. But I believe that the ‘just doing’ and having a plan is the difference between a few extra 0’s in the bank.

There are a ton of us that just do. I was definitely one of them and to this day, I will still say that I am. Planning takes time and when you don’t have the time, you tend to just do.

However there’s a mind shift that’s taking place. Pause for a second, and ask yourself, what’s the point.

Using SureFire as an example. I took a look at the business, which I’ve changed 100 times over (exaggerating), and I asked myself, what am I doing.

Why am I still offering a service that will eat up my time?

Why am I continuing to try and get new customers and build new relationships for projects that are undervalued by my lifestyle? Meaning, taking on a $5,000 project but having it last 2 months, which breaks down to only $2,500 a month, which no where near covers my expenses, but still adds all the stress of managing that project.

How many projects do I need to take on in order to live how I want?

Why am I building an email list with no direct strategy in place to sell something?

What am I selling?

Do I expect people to just read the content and that’s it? Do I want my users to take action? Can I expect my customers to hire me after just seeing a few emails? Do I want my users to hire me for service work, or do I want them to buy something?

All of these questions. I have a few answers, mainly money and comfort, but what’s the real reward.

Don’t get me wrong. Some people love this stuff. Some people would rather code for hours and collect a check. That’s cool if that’s what you like. Personally, I’m kind of done with that. I’ve been doing it for 10+ years, and was stuck in the same spot for quite some time.

Once I shifted my thinking, that’s when things started to fall into place and make more sense. That’s where I’m at right now. Coming to a realization that there’s a lot more out there then just trading in time for money in more than just the hourly sense.

There are people out there that are making a TON of money, and can barely use WordPress. As a developer, how many 100k jobs can you take on by your self?

Take a look at David Siteman Garland. He’s the course guy. All his marketing, all his emails, etc., they all have that one thing in common. Amy Porterfield, she’s the FaceBook chick. That’s where all her emails are marketed to.

So the next time you feel annoyed, burnt out, or just wondering if there’s something else that’s out there.

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